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it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
're going to plant a tree? >> hal: no, i have to pick a religion to join so it will be science science sciencetolgy, or free may sons. we'll be back. >> and now here is something we hope you really like. noups it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ while your carpets may appear clean. it's scary how much dirt your vacuum can leave behind. add resolve deep clean powder before you vacuum to expel the dirt within your carpets. resolve's deep clean powder is moist. absorbing and lifting three times more dirt than vacuuming alone. leaving you with a carpet that's truly fresh and clean. don't just vacuum clean. resolve clean. the chill of peppermint. the rich dark chocolate. york peppermint pattie get the sensation. current tv is the place for true stories. with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines. real, gripping, current. documentaries... on current tv. ♪ >> hal: welcome back to the "stephanie miller show." that was -- that was an amazing yoda laugh from karl frisch. i was impressed. >> great. >> hal: it is always a grover laugh. >> slight variation.
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
: but gandhi was killed by someone of his own religion. >> hal: but that's no indication of the rest of the religion. the ku klux klan is basically a religious organization -- christian organization, but i'm not going to group that in with the rest. there will always be the extremists who believe -- in any group of people there will be your outliers who take what is said, what is spoken of in a group of people -- we agree the scientific method is a very important approach to dealing with things, and then other people will push that to ugenics, you can't save everybody so why should you try? but his whole point was and the route of the religion he was coming from -- and i wouldn't even limit it to hinduism i think it was a genuine human belief, that until we are peaceful with each other, we can never find a real path. and the way example is to live in a peaceful sense in spite of the fact that others might not live that way -- >> caller: i call these kind of talk shows because i do believe like gandhi said, jesus is wonderful, but the people who say they ar
're not the majori majority. we're a minority religion. therefore, this is a very different attitude toward the church than other catholic churches. we are not spain, not ireland even. we recognize all of the other religions have an equal right to their beliefs. that's why they're hesitant on the pro choice issue, even to obey their deepest moral beliefs. but i want to get back to, let me stick to that because the first thing the pope did was call the chief rabbi in rome and open up a relationship. these things, respecting people, it's universal. we americans can agree completely on these good things, and that would be nice because i think we have an american religion. i think we agree on a lot of these things together. and i know what you were feeling when you said you were inspired because there's a common hope that we can find a common morality. >> you're coming back. we'll tall politics, but up next, the debt dual in washington. is something going to get done this year, and would a balanced budget hurt the economy? joining me for debate, the republican wlip in the house, kevin mccarthy,
had a sexual relationship. we have religion involved. and we have got just a pretty defendant with just a heinous, brutal killing. so all those put together, that's why everybody is paying attention to this. >> bill: what's the religion component. >> they are both hormone. travis alexander, the victim had grown up mormon. he has been a mormon his whole life jodi arias, the defendant, converted to mormonism just prior to dating travis alexander. we have a very large mormon community here in arizona. so that has gained a lot of attention. but i think just the fact that a religion is involved and it's so involved here, that's really important to a lot of people watching we just heard the judge reading questions to ms. areas, they came from the jury, right? in your observation of the try trial being in the courtroom how do you think it's going? >> i don't think it's good for jodi at all. arizona is one the few states that allows the jury to ask the witness questions. she was on the stand for 18 days the jury had over 220 questions for her. that is unbelievable. it was the tone and
that two weeks ago true religion, the jeans company announced it wouldn't be renewing its contract with its founder and now former ceo who stepped down this tuesday. today we found out from the "new york post" those firms true religion is trying to sell itself to might be getting out of the bidding. an unexpected leadership change is rarely a sign good things are happening. of course, not all unexpected ceo departures are negative. when a bad ceo gets the boot, see you later, that's always a good thing. hence why we have the "mad money" wall of shame to call out these incompetents. sometimes the boards need to see them on the wall of shame to get motivated. everybody already understands that things are going poorly. for example, the dog that is groupon roared after it announced its foolish founder and ceo andrew mason was being axed at the end of february. same thing happened to avon when wall of shamer andrea young was forced to resign as ceo last april and had to step down as chairman in october. what about when a good ceo leaves, or a great one? we never like losing a talented manager. i
the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >> what i said, i think we're going to win. i don't think we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. and i don't think there is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> what is your take on that with prop 8? will it divide the court as some other issues? >> i think it will be divisive. i can't call exactly what the numbers breakdown will be but it is important to note that in the california situation, what you've got is a state that first gave rights to same sex marriage. to gays. and then yanked it away in this proposition 8. and i think that makes it a different case than whether there is a right to same sex marriage nationally and in all the states. here, it looks very much like something that was given was then taken away and maybe because they just don't like gay people. that is the argument. so in that situation, i think we have a very special case. and there is
in another world. you can see the pope service there, too. great place to be no matter what your religion. >> all of the art alone. you are not taking a picture with a flash but i snap add couple when i was there. you are in paris right now. what about the note dam cathedral? >> i was in note dam yesterday here in paris. it is another one sitting around for 850 years absolutely beautiful place. you walk in you just feel a part of history. from the hunchback of notre dame to modern day. pope francis will be there in a couple days i believe. it's really awesome and right in the middle of paris. >> sounds a little windy there in paris today but i don't feel too bad for you. florence, italy. i was licky enough to be there as well. why should revisit there? >> i am sorry it was a little windy. >> florence italy the cathedral we should visit. >> it is the center of the city. it's the center piece of laurens. you can find it anywhere. it is beautiful tops wonderful place. florence is a great place in general. >> amazing architecture there. >> st. pauls cathedral in london, england that made the
other religions, in the jewish and sikh as well. strong reactions from catholics and they are hoping the twitter messages will assure some type of change and we will have their reactions as it continues. brian for resident, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> the commute is bad, westbound highway 4, it looks like the truck has arrived, a person was stuck inside of a car which flipped over and they are making some progress, but traffic is a mess, they have the right lane blocked and part of that exit lane as well, two lanes are blocked on westbound highway 4 and a lot of the damage is done. it is backed up through antioch and when they clear this crash it will be a big delay for you. but i think that one is also going to be jammed at this time so it is stuck there. >> this is a look at the westbound bay bridge and they have not made it to the bay bridge but there is a 10 minute delay. if you are driving from panola to richmond, we had an earlier accident so the commuters have not made it through yet. let's go to steve. >>> mostly cloudy, partly cloudy to cool, i had a little e-mail from
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
ceremonies including vice-president joseph biden and people from other religions, in the jewish and sikh as well. strong reactions from catholics and they are hoping the twitter messages will assure some type of change and we will have their reactions as it continues. brian for resident, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> the commute is bad, westbound highway 4, it looks like the truck has arrived, a person was stuck inside of a car which flipped over and they are making some progress, but traffic is a mess, they have the right lane blocked and part of that exit lane as well, two lanes are blocked on westbound highway 4 and a lot of the damage is done. it is backed up through antioch and when they clear this crash it will be a big delay for you. but i think that one is also going to be jammed at this time so it is stuck there. >> this is a look at the westbound bay bridge and they have not made it to the bay bridge but there is a 10 minute delay. if you are driving from panola to richmond, we had an earlier accident so the commuters have not made it throu
? >> right. just for all purposes of full disclosure here, i think that -- i believe in religion and i'm not an atheist by any means. but this has been very clear and determined by the courts that this is a violation of the establishment clause of the constitution or the first amendment. and why that is is because you can not have an entanglement of public and religion here. that's what's going on. this is a public school and this is the school putting a seal of approval on a religious piece of art. >> ainsley: okay. david, we want to hear the other side of this because any time we see a nativity, a portrait of jesus, the ten commands, we know it's a matter of time before the aclu will get involved. do they have a case here? >> certainly they may have a case burks i don't think they're going to be victorious. it's not as easy it was just explained. this is a convoluted type of thing. this particular situation is sponsored by a private club within a public school. the supreme court has been very clear -- >> which case? you're absolutely wrong. there has been no case. >> i'm in the middl
on race or gender or sexual orientation or religion or national origin. but it can say for example we will operate this company more efficiently and give the shareholders a greater return on equity if we hire people within this range off, fill in the blanks, for blood pressure and weight because we are now forced to provide you with out care, this is i a more efficient class of people for whom to provide health care. can they do that, yes. dagen: don't you think they are asking for the ire of people around the country and accusations of discrimination in some way? >> not all discrimination is prohibited by law. the only discrimination is the basis by which we talked about. and we know those, gender, race, age, religion, etc. but on the base of health is not prohibited by law. with this exception. the americans for disability act prohibits discriminating against someone because they have an articulable disability. a physical disability, emotional or mental disability. high blood pressure or heavyweight is not immeasurable disability. connell: not taking care of yourself is not a disabi
extremism. city leaders say it is unfair to characterize an entire religion as violent. where was the city when the propalestinian group ran its own hateful ads. >> i think the san francisco official reaction to our ads is obscene and absurd. they wouldn't condemn the hateful statements on the air even when specifically asked to do so. they are only condemning me for drawing attention to those statements as if this problem will go away if we ignore it. >> because of previous first amendment court rulings they must roll the ad. >>> an early morning blaze is still under investigation tonight. this stubborn fire took hours to contain. the flames destroyed two homes. falling power lines made it hard for firefighters to bring the fire under control. >>> from berlin to mountain view a piece of world history is about to get a bigger platform. two large pieces of the berlin wall will soon be in front of the library. they are currently at an office park. there are portions of the wall on display in other parts of the country but this is the only one in the bay area. no word on when the slabs will b
for the next, massive killing in this country for us to get religion on this issue. senator feinstein, i was with her last night, and while she was very disappointed in what she heard from majority leader reed-mack, she was very clear about taking this to it's full and complete resolution. all of us have got to say to our colleagues in congress that fear is not an option. fear of not being read elected, we are paralyzed right now. we have to stop it. >> is there anything that congress can pass to curb the piling -- violence? there is nothing that can be done that would protect our children in the vast majority of america, do you agree with that? >> i refuse to believe that. i am hoping that we will pass some version of a repeal of a writer that has been attached to the appropriations bill. all of us are trying to work to repeal the amendment, which means that it would make it easier for law enforcement to conduct gun tracing efforts. right now they are preventing so many ways. i think there are some measures. uphill battle, but we have to ask the american people that this is a wake-up ca
to wait for the next massive killing in this country for us to get religion on this issue. senator feinstein, i was with her last night. and while she was very disappointed in what she heard from majority leader reid, she was very clear about taking this fight to its full and complete resolution. and i think all of us have got to say to our colleagues in congress that fear is not an option. fear of not being reelected, fear of the nra. we are fairlized in fear right now. and we've got to stop it. >> right. congresswoman lee, is there anything that congress can pass that will curb the violence? a lot of people have been pushing back saying look, there's nothing that could be done in washington, d.c. that would protect our children in the vast majority of america. do you agree with that? >> i refuse to believe that. i believe we can pass back ground checks. i'm hoping we'll pass some version of the repeal of the tee hard amendment. it's a rider. congressman moran, myself, all of us are trying to work to repeal the tiahrt amendment which would make it easier for law enforcement to con
. >> is that how you see it as well? it may cost the workplace or insurance companies or is it about religion? about core believes in that respect that is at the center piece of this argument. >> some argue that. some say this is a religious issue. as far as the federal courts have been concerned, they have looked strictly at the equal protection clause and looked at government action and whether or not it restricts personal freedom. that's the issue. there are friends of the court for religious organizations saying uphold the law, uphold the law. indeed there will be supporters of that. but at the end of the day, the court has to resolve whether or not personal freedoms are aff t affected by restricting 1,000 federal programs and laws that will be affected with the outcome if it's held unconstitutional. >> let's move on to proposition eight. it was passed by california voters in 2008 and amended the state constitution and took away marriage rights of same-sex couple s. now two couples are challenging that. how will this be argued that marriage of same-sex couples in a state that legalized i
yeo economic levels within all religions and every level of education. according to the government. the united states has the worst record in industrialized nation losing five children every day to abuse death. joining me in the studio from the san francisco child abuse prevention center is katie allbright. >> thank you so much for having me around for shining the spotlight on this important issue. >>er love what the prevention does. you are celebrating an anniversary today? >> yes, we have been working in san francisco for 40 years preventing child abuse. we are very excited about our future and vision. we're here to stay and looking forward to the next 40 years. >> cheryl: this was started by a man with immense compassion for the issue? >> he was a pediatrician at general hospital and saw incidents of violence in the hospital, how in the community can come together to protect children. that inspired a man and we were able to do it for 40 years here in san francisco. >> cheryl: you have a number of
or break the electorate down by religion. for example, white evangelicals form a strong part of the republican party base. they are overwhelmingly opposed. but everybody else who is not a white evangelical christian by 20-plus points support freedom to marry. >> i want to go through some of these numbers that show the shift. some of them are in places we might think independents. but a lot of them are not. so, look, this is abc "washington post" polling. '04, 15% of republicans support gay marriage. now 33%, more than double, i'm not a math major but i think that's right. conservatives, 10% in '04 -- three times as much. and minorities, 28 -- this is remarkable and i think honestly, barack obama deserves a significant amount of credit for being an african-american president of the united states, supporting same-sex marriage. 28% in 2004. 61% now. alex, these changes, they're not just -- it's not democrats getting more in favor of it. here's the fundamental question. what does your party do? this is what we have been talking about. you have some people saying -- john huntsman,
republican, religion comes from church, basic moral beliefs. according in this poll, they're the same people. better than that, the business conservatives buy into the cultural issues. cultural driven people buy into the business issues. it's heterogeneous. >> it's heterogeneous internally but they turned inward. a generation ago the republican party reached outward and reached to people who had been democrats. they expanded demographically because they got a lot of catholics, got northern catholics in the party who hadn't been there before and got southerners who had been democrats and who were economically diverse. there were a lot of working class and middle class democrats who came over to the republican party. so they were expanding a generation ago by reaching out. what's happened now, because of ideology, because of the focus on ideology, these two groups look for ideological overlaps and that's all they talk about. that's all they talk about. in common areas they can agree, whether it's abortion or guns or r lower taxes. they're talking to each other, not to the whole country. >> thi
time. i'm not accusing everybody who's against gay marriage as bigotry. it's true that some religions treat that, which may or may not be bigotry. >> this case is the fact that the equal protection clause will create a new class. >> that's the state of this country, and individuals have a right to be treated the same way as everybody else. and that is at the core of this debate. >> a tricky question. but it violates the equal protection clause. you have to create a new class of people. >> do we need more individual rights, or is this a question about marriage? those are two different -- they may be related, but they're two different things. >> that's a very important question. the question before the supreme court, regardless of who's changing their mind on it or whose loved one is gay. who among us doesn't have a loved one who's gay. that's a given. the question is whether the 14th amendment clause should create a new class of people? the supreme court hasn't done that in 30 years. >> it's about whether the equal protection clause protects people who have the right to marry. >> that'
a lot of metrics by silicon valley standards that people look for, ethnicity, religion, personality type. >> reporter: about you end up here, you go through boot camp. >> remost hove the hoodie. take it off right now. >> be on time. geeks are notorious for being late. >> it has been great. i met two people. one of them i was in a relationship with for a while. >> reporter: and amy boasts results. 45 couples in exclusive relationships and nearly 20 marriages. >> wow. nuptials too. lori, seems very pricey along the way. are singles, you know, really willing to pay that much for a date? clearly you have some that walked down the aisle, but in great volume, really? >> yeah, look, $20,000 for eight matches. it seems insane, but the idea is people are willing to pay this. i got on the phone with amy today, she said i'm seeing a boost because it is warming up and geeks want to come out of their caves, stop coding and meet people. the idea is time is money. they're building these companies. they have everything. they have a lot of money, but the one thing they don't have is love so they go to am
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. say and bewould necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. , andhere is this conflict ons conflict is not resolved the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult
the meaning of freedom of religion and the establishment of religion. we debate the meaning of freedom of speech. we debate what equality means and how it translates to equality on issues of race, gender, and sexuality. we debate the role of different branches of government, the role of the president as the commander in chief, and as the head of the executive branch. and the roles of congress and .he roles of the courts as much as they are contentious and changing in the general rinas of american life, they must in turn be translated and interpreted and applied to our armed forces. while it is sometimes true the political decision, the social policy decision, the legal and constitutional decision that emerges in a civilian arena, is transferred in exactly the same manner to our military. there are times when it is not. there are times when the particular necessities of national security or the particular intensity of the organization and values and mission of the military require some just -- adjustment. exactlyot be adopted in the same way in the context of our military. -- deeply gra
of freedom and religion and call on the iranian authorities to respect mr. abedini's human rights and to release him. you know, that is his statement. is that, what more do you want? what more do you expect? >> he made that statement the day he was confirmed but he wasn't secretary of state. since he has been secretary of state senator rubio's office has been following up with secretary kerry's office. he was responding to a question from senator rubio, a written question. here is another one of our points. the state department has never taken a proactive step. everything has been a reaction to a reporter's question, a senator's question. let's issue a statement from the secretary of state. martha: you played down this deadline here today of friday. what do you want by friday. >> we hope it comes before so we can work with the state department a clear statement from john kerry, secretary of state calling for eye saeed abedini's release and calling for iran to release this american citizen today. martha: i will leave everyone with this thought. you remember the hikers and all of th
as officials from various religions around the world. he said authentic power is service. that must have been one of the message that he wanted to get across because he later tweeted that same line. >> and for all of the change that's happening, there's gonna be a lot of similarities because there's very little chance of any change as far as leaning toward liberal stances, roles of women in the church, gay marriage and abortion, correct? >> reporter: that is correct. he's put from the same cloth as his predecessor as benedict xvi and john paul ii. no question about that. the president of argentina was here today. the pope has said he's against handing out condoms for free. those type of issues, the pope doesn't -- those won't be issues he will have a new message on, it seems. >> is there any expectation that he will do as much traveling as pope john paul ii? are we expecting any visits to lasten america? >> reporter: i would think so. there were a lot of -- one thing i should say, he's older. he's 76 years old. he was favoring one leg today as he walked around. he is kind of walking with a li
with religion and so that's where we have the fundamental disagreement. >> which may be part of the problem. i think everybody should be able to be married civilly perhaps, but only some then have a religious ceremony. >> we'll take that. that's all we want. >> religious has a connotation. that's the distinction. >> if the catholic church says they support full civil rights, equal rights for same-sex partners, but they don't want it called marriage in the church, we'd take it. that would be fantastic. >> does it seem like that is exactly what he was doing? >> he hasn't said that publicly. perhaps said it privately. >> in the bishops conference meeting, he said it. >> it's a different prism that they are doing everything through. the prism through the archbishop of buenos aires is different than pope. >> and smaller group of people than the 1.2 billion throughout the world. >> i think we ultimately believe in separation of church and state and equal rights. i don't want a religious leader denying rights to people. >> i don't want to suggest that somehow i'm negative on it. if the new pope is wi
or religion or cult the arrogance of their superiority reminds us that they do not give us right. we grant them power. they do not make us free. we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. the nra ad -- philip rucker, how effective is the nra message right now? guest: a message like that is effective with the base of the nra and many americans that live in some of these dates -- it's dates -- states. you play and add like that in ,est virginia, north carolina north dakota, and it resonates. it is a message about the elite in washington and san francisco, which is a reference to nancy pelosi, the democratic leaders in the house, and it is really trying to create these cultural divisions between decision- makers in washington and people back home who have guns and use them for sport. host: "political" tells us that nra fundraising is that the best in a decade. guest: the nra also reports that membership is growing, something the nra has been effective and skilled
heads of government as well as officials from various religions around the world. he said authentic power is service. that must have been one of the message that he wanted to get across because he later tweeted that same line. >> and for all of the change that's happening, there's gonna be a lot of similarities because there's very little chance of any change as far as leaning toward liberal stances, roles of women in the church, gay marriage and abortion, correct? >> reporter: that is correct. he's put from the same cloth as his predecessor as benedict xvi and john paul ii. no question about that. the president of argentina was here today. the pope has said he's against handing out condoms for free. those type of issues, the pope doesn't -- those won't be issues he will have a new message on, it seems. >> is there any expectation that he will do as much traveling as pope john paul ii? are we expecting any visits to lasten america? >> reporter: i would think so. there were a lot of -- one thing i should say, he's older. he's 76 years old. he was
of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? i was hoping you could give us an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists. because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accelerate a polit
. many of them are in the bill of rights. freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, the right to keep and bear arms -- [cheers and applause] i can't think of any of these at point that aren't under assault by a bunch of leftists that want to deconstruct america. and that does offend me. and so i think it's our job to step up and defend our values and defend the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism. i'll stand there with all of the people that want to rebrand the republican party to work on the economic side of this agenda, but i invite all of them to cover -- come over with all of us to work together on the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism including life and marriage and the rule of law. [applause] and on the life question, it's really pretty simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run aga
come to you to talk about religion at all? guest: we would treat them -- that's another thing. -- re portrayed as just about oil and about greed, i take great exception to that. i believe it does a disservice to those men and women who went and volunteered to go, especially in our medical facilities. at one time, we were treating one of our wounded service members and the person who wounded him. and our folks gave the treatment that they were supposed to give. if anybody else in the world wants to throw stones at us in america, they can go right ahead, but i will point to those kinds of examples to show why we are the freest, greatest country in the world. when we go in -- we left. we did not take a part of iraq. we did not say this is going to be our little piece of ground did we did what we needed to do, and now we are gone -- of ground. andid what we needed to do now we are gone. we are out. iraq is a sovereign country. america, that is who we are. i think that needs to be communicated. host: clint in texas. a democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i just wanted to make a comment. i
to university of kentucky fans is a religion. they expect to be in the tournament every single year. >> bill: and i would argue that they should be in this year because they won last year. >> okay. all right. because they won last year. okay. fine. never mind the fact that they went out in the first round of the nit. >> bill: who were -- >> some guy named robert morris. >> bill: okay. chester is not happy and he claims that on -- >> and i think it's a disgrace and a joke that the ncaa didn't put us in the tournament if you ask me it's a bunch of liberal socialism -- [ laughter ] >> and your party's partially responsible for it. >> your party? he's blaming me? >> bill: liberal socialism, man. blame it on bernie sanders. >> yeah, right. >> bill: all right. hey great lineup for you today, as always reporters from "the daily beast" and "politico," is going to be here in studio to talk about the president's trip to the middle east and speak with judy chu from southern california, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press" press. >> overhead lions making news. i
of its suffering, but also all of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, jud judiasm, christianity that trace their roots to abraham and has inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were actually drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. the african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from savory through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding onto the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots the store row spoke to a yearning for every human being for a home. even as we draw strength from god's will and the freedom expressed on pass over we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect wo
paul. and i am an old time lutheran. is not to be trusted. it is important to know exactly the religion of our candidates. there is nothing more important. host: she is gone. father is apaul's christian and religious man. the republican party is going through rebuilding and redesign and try to figure out what they will do and rand paul could be a big part of that. he had a filibuster on the floor and i'm sure we will be hearing his name more in the future. host: mechanicsville, va., go ahead. caller: i have a question -- when you are debating about the budget, why do they continue to put amendments in there that have absolutely nothing to do with - the budget. ? guest: that the great question. it's because they can. there is a role in the senate that says they can attach strings to the budget and no one can stop them. that the opportunity senators have, they took it. mideast policy got involved and to guns and so they did whatever they wanted to do. that was on full display. not covered in the lessons proffered by "school house rock." you talked about briefly but you can expand about ho
and religion." we grant them power. we protect them. they do not make us free. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. ourre america and politicians are only as powerful as we the people will allow. the latest from the nra, again focusing on guns, background checks. a look at guns and video games in our country. of course, front and center, following what happened in newtown, conn. last december. the hearst newspaper focusing on all of these issues, this writing -- chronicle," exploring one aspect of our culture, the prevalence of violence in our media. read some of the opinions available online. a lot of people weighing in on all of this. brian joins us from sterling heights, michigan. morning. caller: how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: excellent. video games, as long as a , let thes a scapegoat parents raise the kids. back in the 1980's and 1990's anytime someone killed someone they blamed metal music. it is the same thing here. someone was out, they start shooting at people -- people play video games. he played video games. that is what it is. no. it starts at
don't believe everything should be put up to a sproept freedom to speech, freedom of religion, freedom to smaer not something we take votes on. it belongs to all of us under the constitution and that is why we have court. >> freedom to marry belongs to everyone, but what marriage is, you're talking about redefining marriage. >> marriage is not defined by who's denied it. >> this isn't "cross fire." i want to end with you. go ahead. >> an odd way to think about constitutional law to sap that the court should refrain from deciding whether something is constitutional or not, even if it would be advantageous for the nation as a whole to have the conversation continue in politics. the court is a passive body. it doesn't get to decide whether to take a case, also doesn't get to decide once a case is befores it, granted review to punt on that case simply because the politician conversation vo continue. something is either constitutional or it's not. >> and they are constitution. >> it's difficult to predict what the high court lieutenant do -- will do in a case like this, based on obama care.
to their religion or ethnicity, are starting to push back in some instances. there is a great deal of concern. i want to assure you, i mentioned i have met people the pre syrian army, and we have highlighted the worries of minority groups and christians, not that we are against the sunni majority of syria. we are not. the minorities are nervous and there might -- their rights must be protected and respected. we hear good things from them. i can tell you for example that they have met christian leaders from some of the communities in syria and have told us afterwards that their meetings were populated. we have to keep pushing in that direction. >> thank you. if you could touch on the chemical weapons issues. was called a red line and there have been reports as recently in the last 24 hours about what is actually happening on the ground, whether they have been used, whether they will be used. if you could just talk about what the administration is doing to prevent the transfer of these weapons to groups. thank you. >> we viewed this issue with extreme seriousness. it is incredibly important to us.
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
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